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ACC CV Quality SmartBrief

The ACC CV Quality SmartBrief eNewsletter is a free, twice-weekly briefing for health care stakeholders interested in quality care. Learn more about the ACC CV Quality SmartBrief and subscribe.

  • Quality improvement needed in heart failure care, study says

    Analysis of the Change the Management of Patients with Heart Failure registry found gaps in adherence to guideline-recommended treatments for heart failure, a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology said. "There is a compelling need for multifaceted quality improvement systems to be implemented in every setting in which patients with heart failure receive care," said senior author Gregg Fonarow of the University of California at Los Angeles. Medscape (free registration) (7/17) Learn More

  • Study: Hospital staff routines contribute to patient sleep problems

    Dutch researchers found 70.4% of hospital patients reported being awakened from sleep by external causes and staff were part of the reason in more than half of cases, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine. Researchers said most of the problems with poor sleep in hospital patients could be addressed by making simple changes in hospital nightly routines, such as dimmed lights, remote alarms and webcams to monitor vital signs. MedPage Today (free registration) (7/18) Learn More

  • Study links cardiac arrest resuscitation teams to survival rates

    A study in the journal Circulation found hospitals that have successful cardiac arrest resuscitation teams are more likely to have increased survival rates, compared with other facilities. Characteristics of successful resuscitation teams in top-performing hospitals included having a designated team with clinicians from diverse disciplines, clearly defined responsibilities, improved leadership and communication, and in-depth mock codes. Healio (free registration) (7/17) Learn More

  • Fewer nurses tied to longer emergency visits

    Emergency department patients had longer stays and more patients left without being seen when nurse staffing was lower, according to a single-center study in the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine. The findings were based on a retrospective review of data from a 2015 nursing shortage at the hospital. Medscape (free registration) (7/19) Learn More

  • Only 14% of doctors offer video visit services, survey finds

    A Deloitte survey of 624 primary care and specialty care doctors from the US found that while 66% cited the role of virtual care technology in improving patient access to care, only 14% offer such capabilities, while 18% plan to add these tools within the next year or two. The findings revealed several barriers to telehealth adoption, including worries about potential medical errors and the privacy of patients' information, as well as the lack of virtual care technologies offered within health care organizations. MedCity News (7/18) Learn More

  • Multispecialty practice uses HIE to improve health care service

    Using the OnePartner health information exchange enabled multispecialty practice Holston Medical Group to identify patients who are "habitual utilizers of services," access data from disparate EHRs across its system and streamline hospital processes, said CIO Wesley Combs. "If you understand value-based medicine and the economics of health care, regarding insurance, risk identification and stratification, it doesn't take any time for an HIE to give a return on investment in value-based contracting -- if you are starting to go at risk," Combs said. Healthcare Informatics online (7/18) Learn More

  • Appeals court dismisses lawsuit against 340B cuts

    HealthLeaders Media (7/17) Learn More


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